Tag Archives: Ethernet switch

Understanding Power Consumption of PoE Ethernet Switch

As PoE changes to meet today’s increasing application requirements like IP cameras or WiFi access points, it’s widely used for enterprises networks. Using a PoE or PoE+ switch, technicians can simplify the cabling installation because the PoE technology can support power and data transmission over the same cables. When choosing a PoE Ethernet switch, we always care about the ports and power consumption most. This article will introduce the power consumption of PoE Ethernet switch and take two PoE Ethernet switches as examples to explain power consumption.

What Is Power Consumption of PoE Ethernet Switch?

At present, PoE power consumption follows two standards, IEEE 802.3af and 802.3at. The original IEEE 802.3af rules that power consumption on each port of a PoE network switch can be up to 15.4W. The updated IEEE 802.3at standard also named PoE+, which is backward-compatible with IEEE 802.3af, provides up to 25.5W of power on each port. However, because the power dissipate exists in cables, the minimum output power assured on each port for PoE switch is 12.95W, and 25.5W for PoE+ switch.

power consumption standard

Figure 1: IEEE 802.3af and IEEE 802.3at standards.

The key to successful PoE installation is to ensure that the selected power over Ethernet switch provides the necessary watts of PoE required for each device, and the total power consumption also must be guaranteed for powering all devices. Simply put, the total power consumption of all the connected devices must be controlled in the range of the PoE switch max power consumption.

How Many Devices Can I Connect to My PoE Ethernet Switches?

Power consumption of 150W and 400W are the most popular choices on the market. The following are two switches from FS, 8 port PoE switch and 24 port PoE switch, and we’ll use them to further explain the question how many devices can we connect to my PoE Ethernet switches.

PoE Ethernet switches applications

Figure 2: How many devices can be connected to a PoE switch?

How Many Devices Can the 8 Port PoE Switch Connect?

FS S1150-8T2F switch is a managed PoE+ switch. It has 8 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 ports, and 2 Gigabit SFP slots. Its PoE standard complies with IEEE802.3af/at. And designed with a max power consumption of 150W, each port can support up to 30W power. This means the switch provides the availability of PoE on all 8 RJ45 ports, and each port can potentially power devices that are connected. From the above, we know the standard PoE can supply 15.4W power for each port, and 30W for PoE+. Therefore, this switch can simultaneously connect 8(15.4W×8=123.2W<150W) devices that use IEEE 802.3af standard, and only 5(30W×5=150W) devices that use IEEE 802.3at standard. For example, if a typical outdoor IP camera needs a PoE power of 20W, the connection of 7 typical IP cameras will require 140W of PoE power (7×20W), which is well within the power consumption of this network switch.

How Many Devices Can the 24 Port PoE Switch Connect?

FS S1400-24T4F managed PoE+ switch is designed with 24 Gigabit PoE+ ports, 1 console port and 4 Gigabit SFP ports. This switch complies with IEEE 802.3af/at with a max power consumption of 400W and 30W for each port. Through a calculation, we know the 24 port switch can connect 24(15.4W×24=369.6W<400W) devices with PoE standard at the same time, and support 13(30W×13=390W<400W) devices with PoE+ standard. And as for the same outdoor IP camera with a power requirement of 20W, the 24 port switch can support 20(20×20W=400W) cameras.

Conclusion

Knowing the power consumption of PoE Ethernet switches is very important. If you want to connect multiple devices to a PoE switch, you need to calculate the total power consumption that all the devices require, and make sure you PoE switch can provide the needed current.

What Is a KVM Switch and How Does It Work?

Today, data centers and companies have to deal with the space limitation of lots of computers. They need a method to control the increasing numbers of computers and other networking devices efficiently. KVM switches are invented to combat this issue that is taking up valuable space and time. So what is a KVM switch and how does it work?

what is a KVM switch

Figure: KVM switch is widely used in our life.

What Is a KVM Switch?

What is KVM? KVM stands for keyboard, video and mouse. And as for what is a KVM switch, it’s technically “keyboard, video and mouse switch”. KVM switch is a hardware device that allows users to control different computers through one set of keyboard, video monitor and mouse. This is the KVM over IP solution, which is very useful if the server settings are located off-site and you don’t want to drive over there each time when you need to make changes. The switches will be assigned an IP address and accessed from any place in the world with the right username and password.

In addition, we should note that, although KVM switch and Gigabit Ethernet switch both can control multiple computers or servers, they are different devices. KVM switch is usually considered as a hardware device, which is popular when people have upgraded their computer systems or add new computers but don’t want to invest in a second keyboard, display and mouse. While Ethernet switch is regarded as a central hub. Commonly, it’s connected to each computer or network device in an Ethernet. Therefore, they are two different devices with different functions.

How Does KVM Switch Work?

We have a good understanding of the question what is a KVM switch. It can control more than two or greater numbers of computers(over 500). Users can use Cat5 cables or the specific KVM cable kits to connect the computers to the KVM switch. Then, connect the keyboard, display and mouse console to the KVM switch. If the switch is equipped with the console, this step could be skipped. Now users can use a button, on-screen display controls or hot keys on the keyboard to switch from one computer to another.

Which Type of KVM Switch Do I Need?

Designed for various end-user needs, there is a considerable choice of KVM switches on the market. Before buying, you should consider:

  • How many computers do I need to control?
  • What type of KVM switch do I require?
  • Do I need an on-screen display?

Use the table below to help you make a suitable decision.

FS ID
Server Port
8 × HDB-15 Female
16 × RJ45 port
8 × RJ45 port
Console Port
USB/PS2, VGA
USB, VGA
USB/PS2, VGA
On-screen Display
Yes
Yes
No

All these KVM switches are made by FS.COM, which can be accessed from any computer on the LAN, WAN or Internet. With easy installation and use, they’re the optimal solutions for controlling up to 8 or 16 computers or servers.

Conclusion

What is a KVM switch? It’s an ideal tool for saving time and energy when lots of computers or servers are involved. To find out more about our KVM switches with high performance, as well as other networking options like 10Gb Ethernet switch, patch panels, please visit FS.COM.

Deploying 10G ToR/Leaf Switch for Different Size Networks

With the migration from Gigabit Ethernet to 10 Gigabit Ethernet, cabling and network switching architectures have been reevaluated to guarantee a cost-effective and smooth transition. 10Gb ToR (Top of Rack) or leaf switch has evolved with significant performance gains and cost-per-port reduction. This post will introduce the benefits of ToR architecture and explains how to deploy 10G ToR/leaf switch for different size networks.

Why Use Top-of-Rack Architecture

ToR or leaf-spine is a network architecture design where there are only two tiers of switches between the servers and the core network. In ToR network design, a feature-rich 10GbE switch handles Layer2 and Layer3 processing, data bridging and Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) for an entire rack of servers. This approach contributes to an agile infrastructure because the ToR/leaf switches can support multiple I/O interfaces, including GbE, 10GbE and 40GbE. The 10G ToR/leaf switches utilized in the ToR architecture usually come with the advantage of low power consumption, ease of scale and simplified cabling complexity. When acting as a ToR/leaf switch, each 10G Ethernet switch can be placed just one hop away from another, no need to jump up and down in the tree design, enabling improved latency and bottlenecks. With a ToR design, you can eliminate cabling nightmares, minimize bottlenecks while building a network foundation for mission-critical applications that also provides a clear path for future growth.

Top of Rack Architecture

Campus Network Applications

For campus networks applications, the 10GE switches work as aggregation or core switches in the ToR network architecture. Here we take FS S5850-48S6Q 10G ToR/leaf switch as an example to illustrate how to build a ToR network in campus networks. In the following application diagram, two FS S5850-48S6Q 10GE switches are utilized as aggregation switches as the bridge to build connections between 40G switches in the core network and gigabit switches in the access layer.

10G ToR Switch Campus Network Application

SMB (Small and Medium-Sized Business) Applications

For small and medium-sized businesses, ToR network architectures are becoming more preferable by IT managers than ever before. Because ToR architectures enable them to implement a single cabling model that can support Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet and unified network fabric today, while supporting future 40 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet standards as they come to market. Using ToR architecture for fiber cable management, business IT managers have the flexibility to deploy preconfigured racks with different connectivity requirements in any rack position. For example, a rack of servers running multiple Gigabit Ethernet connections can be placed next to a rack of servers with 10 Gigabit Ethernet and FCoE connections to each server.

Data Center Applications

In hyper-scale data centers, there might be hundreds or thousands of servers that are connected to a network. In this case, ToR/leaf switches work in conjunction with spine switches in data centers to aggregate traffic from server nodes and then connect to the core of the network. Now given that we need to build a data center fabric with a primary goal of having at least 480 10G servers in the fabric. In this case, we can use FS S8050-20Q4C as spine switch and S5850-32S2Q as ToR/leaf switch. As shown in the figure below, the connections between spine switches (FS S8050-20Q4C) and ToR/leaf switches (FS S5850-32S2Q) are 40G, while connections between the leaf switches and servers are 10G. The port numbers on each spine switch determines the number of leaf switches we can use. But the maximum amount of 10G servers we can connect to ToR/leaf switch here is 24 because the ratio of reasonable bandwidth between leaf and spine switch cannot exceed 3:1. Thus the total amount of bandwidths we can get here is 480x10G.

10G ToR Switch Data Center Application

Top-of-Rack Cabling Recommendations

ToR network architectures utilize available cabling media options with flexibility at the rack level, using various server patch cable types, while taking advantage of fiber uplinks from the rack for horizontal cabling. Investment in the cabling media for 10, 40, and 100 Gigabit Ethernet connectivity involves striking a balance among bandwidth, flexibility, and scalability. Although both fiber and copper can support 10G, 40G and 100G transmission, fiber is the recommended horizontal cabling media as it offers an optimal solution for high speed 40G and 100G transmission over relatively long distances. Note that 40G and 100G transmission calls for multiple fiber strands (OM3, OM4, and SMF fiber).

Conclusion

The choice of ToR networking architecture can substantially affect throughput, sustainability, optimum density and energy management. As the key element of building ToR networks, 10G ToR/leaf switch can help you scale up networking architecture while delivering low-latency and high-bandwidth links. FS S5850/N5850 series switches are high performance 10GbE ToR/leaf switches which can work with Broadcom, Cisco, Juniper, Arista switches, as well as other major brands. For more information about 10GbE ToR/leaf switches, please kindly visit www.fs.com.

Related Article: 10G ToR/Leaf Ethernet Switch: What Is the Right Choice?